North American Birds

VOLUME 69 NO3 2016

A Quarterly Journal of Ornithological Record Published by the American Birding Association. The mission of the journal is to provide a complete overview of the changing panorama of our continent’s birdlife.

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Figure 16. This Swainson's Warbler present 28 May (here) through 3 June 2015 at Hidden Valley Park, Clay County, Missouri was far north of the cane stands along Ozark rivers in southern Missouri where the species is usually found. Photograph by Linda Williams. Figure 17. Further evidence suggesting local nesting, 15 Scaly-breasted Munias were seen in fields bordering the highway that crosses Cozumel Island, Quintana Roo 25 July 2015. The species is found in even larger flocks on the adjacent mainland, e.g., at Playa del Carmen. Photograph by José Antonio Linaje. T H E C H A N G I N G S E A S O N S : R E T R O S P E C T N O R T H A M E R I C A N B I R D S 352 ing vagrancy of hummingbirds—the span of which still leaves veteran birders dumb- founded. In 1996, we could never have imagined that a Xantus's Hummingbird would appear in November 1997 to spend almost a year at Gibsons, British Columbia, much less that it would become immortal- ized in a full-length feature film starring Steve Martin. So why not a Magnificent Hummingbird for the province (Figure 12)? The species has reached northern Califor- nia, northern Colorado (multiple times, even breeding!), and the East, as far north as Virginia. Perhaps Alaska is next. We have expended much prose in puzzling, and gushing, about hummingbird vagrants in this column in the past twenty years. While some of the species we consider certainly have expanded their ranges, we are at a loss to comprehend what drives so many of these birds to move so far out of range. A clue may come from Central America. Oliver Ko- mar writes: "Many 'resident' hummingbirds in the tropics occasionally, or even routinely, travel long distances in search of seasonal flowering plants, often giving the impres-

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