North American Birds

VOLUME 69 No1 2016

A Quarterly Journal of Ornithological Record Published by the American Birding Association. The mission of the journal is to provide a complete overview of the changing panorama of our continent’s birdlife.

Issue link: http://nab.aba.org/i/629070

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N O R T H A M E R I C A N B I R D S 92 W E S T E R N G R E AT L A K E S Newman, Mark Newstrom, Frank J. Nicoletti, Kate Nicoletti, Andrew Nyhus (ANy), Greg Norwood, Gary O'Boyle, Darrin O'Brien, Phil Odum, Alec Olivier, Beth Olson, Edgar Otto, Nancy B. Overcott, Andy Paulios (eBird Wis - consin), David Pavlik (DPv), Rob Pendergrast, Douglas L. Pierzina, Carolyn Pomarius, Tom Prestby (eBird Wisconsin), Eric Ripma, Chris - tine & Scotty Roberts (C&SR), Karl Roe, Da- vid Ruid, Joe Schaufenbuel (Wisconsin), Joel Schmidt (JSc), Chace Scholten (CSc), Dave Schloff (DSc), Kerry Schloff (KSc), Andrew D. Smith, Kevin D. Smith, Thomas O. Smythe, Joseph M. Soehnel, M. J. Springettt, Jonathan Stein (JSt), Dave Stimac (DSt), Andrew Stur - gess, Peder H. Svingen, Gary Swanson, Scott Terry, Daryl Tessen, Tom A. Tustison, Jim E. Va - nAllen, Jude Vickery, Phil Vreeman, Mike Wag- ner (MWa), Terry Walls, Magill Weber (MWe), Lori Widmann, Mark Wloch (MWl), Terry P. Wiens, Kay H. Williamson, Evelyn Wood, Rita Wiskowski, Jonathan T. Wuepper (Michigan), and Dale A. Yerger. We offer sincere thanks to the hundreds of additional contributors who could not be cited here individually. n –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Peder H. Svingen, 2602 East 4th Street, Duluth, Minnesota 55812, (psvingen@gmail.com) Boston, Calvin Brennan (CaB), Cynthia Bridge (CyB), Paul E. Budde (Minnesota), Adam M. Byrne (eBird Michigan), David A. Cahlander, Allen T. Chartier (Michigan), Joel C. Claus, Erik L. Collins, Tim Cornish, Paul Dannels, Herb H. Dingmann, Louis Dombroski, Robert M. Dunlap, Kim R. Eckert, Roger A. Eriksson, Monica K. Essenmacher, Dave Essian, Bruce A. Fall (eBird Minnesota), Virgil Gantner, Steve Gasser, Anne Geraghty, Michael Gray, Aaron Greene, Jeff Grotte, Dan & Pam Guynn (D&PG), Skye Haas, Tom Heatley (THe), Jeff & Nancy Heeman (J&NH), Jason Heinen (JHe), Michael L. Hendrickson, Anthony X. Hertzel, Anthony Hewitt (AHe), Jena High - kin (JHi), Tom Hince (THi), Gerald Hoekstra, William Holton, Joanie Hubinger (JHu), Mark Hubinger (MHu), Curt Jacoby, Robert B. Jans - sen, Nancy Johnson, Jeanie M. Joppru, Ron & Jan Joslyn (R&JJ), Ted R. Keyel, Doug W. Kieser, Jan & Larry Kraemer (J&LK), Darrell Lawson, James W. Lind, Kyle Lindemer, Scott Loss, Tom Lucier, Craig R. Mandel, Carl & Judi Manning (C&JM), Scott B. Meyer, Tom Mey - er, Kip Miller, Georgina Mixon, Jym Mooney, Bruce Moorman (BMo), William Mueller, Eric Munch, Brad Murphy (BMu), Bob Myers (BMy), Steve & Mary Nesgoda (S&MN), Jeff especially signifcant for Michigan, as 3 young were found in a nest 2 Aug (ph. AMB). Blue Grosbeak breeding was suspected in Wiscon - sin, where one was last seen in Sauk 28 Aug (KL); record late for the Badger State was a Blue Grosbeak banded in Sheboygan 5 Oct (ph. TM). Rare in Michigan, a Western Meadowlark was heard calling in Keweenaw 19 Oct (†LD). Note - worthy fnch totals during the Hawk Ridge/Les- ter River Census included 2241 Purple Finches 20 Oct, followed by another record high of 5122 on 24 Oct; 8435 Common Redpolls 9 Nov followed by 7271 on 12 Nov; and 4762 Pine Siskins 19 Oct followed by 4708 on 1 Nov (all data courtesy of KJB and Hawk Ridge Bird Observatory). Addendum: Michigan's second Clark's Nut- cracker visited the Abbaye Peninsula, Baraga 13 Oct 2013 (ph. Paul Newson). Cited observers (subregional editors in bold- face): Mark & Eve Allen (M&EA), Jennifer Ambrose, Brad Anderson, Nick Anich (eBird Wisconsin), Linda Atkins, Tim Baerwald, Elizabeth Baker, Karl J. Bardon, Kim Beach- Goodman (KB-G), Giff Beaton, Patrick B. Beauzay, Dan Belter, Stephanie Bielke, Michael Iowa. The Region stands at the crossroads of North American avian distribution and disper - sal. Northern vagrants included Gyrfalcon and Common Raven in Iowa. Southern vagrants continue to be noteworthy, with records of Black-bellied Whistling-Duck, Mottled Duck, Wood Stork, Roseate Spoonbill, and Swallow- tailed Kite. Western vagrants and rarities in - cluded Whooping Crane, Ferruginous Hawk, Missouri's second Calliope Hummingbird, Bo - hemian Waxwing, Townsend's Solitaire, and Varied Thrush. Iowa hosted several Red Phala - ropes, Parasitic and Long-tailed Jaegers, and Sa- bine's Gulls. Irruptive species were few, though Iowa did report fve Snowy Owls. Pine Siskin was the only winter fnch that occurred other than an isolated report of Red Crossbills from Missouri. Landbird banding data from Missouri Western State University at St. Joseph included record numbers of some fall migrant passerines, with captures peaking during the rainy October. Abbreviations: Ada (Ada Hayden Park, Story, IA); Errington (Errington Marsh, Polk, IA); Gram - mer Grove (Grammer Grove W.A., Marshall, IA); Hawkeye (Hawkeye W.A., Johnson, IA); Hitchcock (Hitchcock N.A., Pottawattamie, IA); Maryville (Maryville Sewage Lagoons, Nodaway, MO); many areas by mid-season. Kansas City estab- lished a new record-low temperature of 37º F during the early morning hours of 13 Septem - ber, breaking a 124-year-old record, while in Iowa on the same date, Mason City and Spencer recorded record lows of 31º F with scattered light frost across much of the state. October saw the highest rainfall totals in Missouri since re - cord keeping began in 1895. Winter weather ar- rived very early, with extreme cold over much of the Region by mid-November. The severe cold snap brought widespread snowfall across both states. In Iowa, sub-zero temperatures were re - corded two weeks before Thanksgiving, and the lowest temperature of the season was -16º F in Swea City in extreme northern Iowa 27 Novem - ber 27. Iowa experienced the highest November snowfall totals since 1991. The combination of weak fronts, poor weath - er, and early frigid temperatures were likely the cause for unusually low maximum counts for several species. Nowhere was this more evident than at hawkwatches in Iowa. The Hitchcock hawkwatch recorded record low totals for Os - prey, Northern Harrier, Sharp-shinned Hawk, Cooper's Hawk, Red-tailed Hawk, and Ameri - can Kestrel. Waterfowl and shorebird high counts were also noted as particularly low in Joseph W. Eades –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– W eather in the Region was variable but cooler than normal, especially in the latter half of the season. The only triple-digit temperatures in the Region during the season occurred in Missouri 24-25 August. Coupled with increased rainfall, this mildness ended previously existing drought conditions in Iowa & Missouri

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