North American Birds

VOLUME 68 NO2 2015

A Quarterly Journal of Ornithological Record Published by the American Birding Association. The mission of the journal is to provide a complete overview of the changing panorama of our continent’s birdlife.

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N O R T H A M E R I C A N B I R D S 198 H u d s o n - d e l awa r e Shaibal Mitra (Long Island, NY: mitra@mail. csi.cuny.edu), Mike Morgante (Niagara Fron- tier subregion, NY: morgm@adelphia.net), Matt Perry (Oneida Lake Basin subregion, NY: mperry63@roadrunner.com), Ralph T. Water- man Bird Club, Derek Rogers, Frank Rohr- bacher (Delaware: rohrbaf@aol.com), John Shemilt, Robert Spahn (Genesee Ornithologi- cal Society), David Wheeler (Oneida Lake Ba- sin subregion, NY: tigger64@aol.com), Angus Wilson, Lance Verderame (Sullivan County Bird Notes), Will Yandik (Hudson–Mohawk subregion, NY: wyandik@hotmail.com), Mat- thew A. Young (Susquehanna subregion, NY: wyandik@hotmail.com), Robert P. Yunick. n –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Frank Rohrbacher, 5 neva Court, wilmington, delaware 19810, (rohrbaf@aol.com) Robert O. Paxton, 460 riverside drive, apt. 72, new York, new York 10027, (rop1@columbia.edu) Shaibal S. Mitra, department of Biology, College of staten Island, 2800 Victory Boulevard, staten Island, new York 10314 (shaibal.mitra@csi.cuny.edu) Tom Reed, 81 reeds Beach road, Cape May Court House, new Jersey 08210, (coturnicops@gmail.com) Marshes C.B.C., Hamilton, NJ 28 Dec (fde Mary Doscher). A few hundred Purple Finches were tallied from 30 C.B.C.s in New York and New Jersey; 5 on the Bombay Hook C.B.C., Kent, DE 15 Dec (fde APE) made Delaware's only winter fnches on the state's seven C.B.C.s. By early Jan, the numbers of winter fnches reported began to decrease—surprising, as the brutal weather should have forced some to feeders. Contributors (subregional compilers in bold- face): Deborah Allen (Central Park, New York City), Scott Barnes (Voice of New Jersey Audubon), Michael Bochnik (Lower Hud- son Valley, NY: bochnikm@cs.com), Jeffrey S. Bolsinger (St. Lawrence, NY: jsbolsinger@ yahoo.com), Thomas W. Burke (New York Rare Bird Alert), Barbara Butler (Dutchess, NY), Mark Chao (Finger Lakes Region, NY: markchao@imt.org), Andrew P. Ednie, Sam Galick, Paul A. Guris, Laurie Larson (New Jer- sey Birds listserve), Pat J. Lindsay (Long Island and New York City: pjlindsay@optonline.net), Melinda McCormack (Adirondack–Cham- plain subregion, NY: Mruddyduck@aol.com), were found with starlings and blackbirds along Cods Rd., Sussex, DE 26 Feb (BGP). Last winter, the Region was inundated with winter fnches, but in 2014, the Canadian cone crop was excel- lent; thus essentially no winter fnches arrived in the Region. Christmas Bird Count data un- derscore how few winter fnches were present: no White-winged Crossbills or Hoary Redpolls were recorded on any of the New York, New Jersey, or Delaware counts. Six Pine Grosbeaks on the Johnstown–Gloversville C.B.C., Fulton, NY 23 Dec (fde Pamela Hunt), 5 Red Crossbills on the Elizabethtown C.B.C., Essex, NY 21 Dec (fde Charlotte Demers), and 15 Evening Gros- beaks at Scio, Allegany, NY 14 Dec (fde Rus- sell Allen) were the only C.B.C. records of these species. Common Redpolls were far from com- mon: only 40 individuals were reported from seven C.B.C.s, all in inland New York, with 20 seen during the Dunkirk–Fredonia C.B.C., Chautauqua 1 Jan (fde Joanne Goetz). Pine Sis- kins were also found on only seven C.B.C.s. New York's total was 54 shared among three counts; four counts in New Jersey recorded sis- kins, with the high count of 19 on the Trenton Virginia Beach); C.B.B.T. (Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel, Northampton); Chinc. (Chincoteague N.W.R., Accomack); Craney (Craney Island, Portsmouth). WATERFOWL THROUGH QUAIL Maryland's second record of Pink-footed Goose was established by 2 at Quarry Lake, Baltimore, MD 25 Jan–4 Feb (JD, BDe, m.ob.). Six Greater White-fronted Geese were at a Stuarts Draft pond, Augusta 23 Dec (BTe); 2 remained through 2 Feb (WL, m.ob.). Seven Greater White-fronted Geese were at Spottswood, Augusta 8 Feb (AL). In Maryland, there were 17 individuals spread across nine counties (m.ob.), including a no- table count of 6 at White's Ferry, Montgom- ery 26 Jan (DCz et al.). Multiple neck-col- lared Greater Snow Geese frequented lower Northampton in Feb, including 3 ad. females banded on Bylot Island, Nunavut one in Aug 2009 and 2 in Aug 2013 (RL, ESB, m.ob.). A Ross's Goose at Mainland Farm, James City 4 Dec provided a long-awaited frst local re- cord (BW, MAB, BT). The 4 Ross's Geese tal- lied on the Hopewell C.B.C. 15 Dec (fde AD, AB) made the state's high count for the sea- son. There were 23 Ross's Geese in Maryland freezing, concentrating waterfowl in pockets of water kept open only by stiff currents or the collective body heat of the birds present. Despite the inhospitable weath- er, birders across the Region were treated to a very exciting season by any measure. The record-breaking fight of Snowy Owls overshad - owed the remarkable movement of Red-necked Grebes, White-winged Scoters, and other waterbirds fee- ing the freezing Great Lakes and other water bodies to the north. The sea- son was also not without its share of rari - ties, including Pink-footed Goose, Barnacle Goose, Barrow's Goldeneye, Western Grebe, Say's Phoebe, Vermilion Flycatcher, Varied Thrush, Western Tanager, and Bullock's Oriole. In addition to our many individual contributors, we thank Adam D'Onofrio, Matt Hafner, Dan Perkuchin, Jo Solem, and Bill Williams for their assistance in compil- ing and interpreting this season's records; we offer special thanks to Perri Rothemich, for help in compilation of Snowy Owl reports. Abbreviations: Back Bay (Back Bay N.W.R., Mark T. Adams Arun Bose Robert Ostrowski –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– W inter temperatures in Virginia fea- tured a bit of everything: above- average warmth in December, a very cold January, and a near-average Feb- ruary. December was very wet, but precipi- tation in January and February fell near the long-term averages. Maryland experienced below-average temperatures on the whole, as did most of the eastern United States. In stark contrast to the past several winters, many of the rivers experienced signifcant Middle Atlantic

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